______
FEATURED POET
Poetry Corner
COPYRIGHT © 2006-2017 rosalienebacchus.com. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
THIS PAGE WAS LAST UPDATED ON: 4 MAY 2017
LISTEN TO
Hounded going
home
Out buying
Skittles candy.
Did you cry out?
Could you?

HAIKU POEM
ROSALIENE BACCHUS

When they started skinning you,
at what point did you not feel
the knife anymore, the knife
sliding down your black back?

At which vertebrae was it?  
Or was it at the bony elbow
of your left arm
or your leg - right leg?

    *

What was it you did?  Crack
your overseer's skull with a crowbar?
look at his wife?  walk home
after work, after dark?  

When did you become a model
for that figure in Michaelangelo's
Last Judgment?  That human skin
held from the head by a finger, no
different from a trophy tiger rug or
the trashed fur from an edible hare.

Did you cry out?  Could you?

Did you see those cracker faces laughing
at your agony, goading the skinners on?
Did you see their kids whoop it up
when they strung up your bones?

Of course, you never knew of your success,
you never heard the grandfatherly stories
passed down to the next generation, or saw
your photograph in the family album, hanging
from a tree with little Billie-Bob giggling
by your feet.

Better than a carnival and didn't cost a cent.



First published in Thunder Sandwich #25 – 2005
An Online Journal of Poetry, Prose and Art
Published & Edited by Jim Chandler

When the Pain Stopped
Excerpt - Part II
Angela Consolo Mankiewicz
DID YOU
CRY OUT?
IN MEMORY OF
TRAYVON MARTIN
Angela Consolo
Mankiewicz was born
and raised in Brooklyn,
New York, and currently
lives with her husband
in Los Angeles,
Southern California.

Angela's poetry has
appeared in over 100
literary journals and
magazines. Her
chapbooks include
As If, An Eye, Wired,
and
Cancer Poems.

Her Play/Chamber
Opera,
One Day Less,
music by D. Javelosa,
was performed in May
2010.

Recognitions include
Amelia 1st Prize
Broadside; Trellis Grand
Prize Sestina;
Jerseyworks 2nd prize
Annual Poetry
Competition; and two
Pushcart nominations.

I felt driven to write “When the Pain Stopped” after reading
a news story about a twelve year old Islamic girl in the Middle East
who was stoned to death for exposing her feet in a public place. And
as I was writing it, I kept seeing the image of a young black man in
the American south hanging from a tree for looking at a white
woman. That became section II of this poem. The bases may differ
but they are linked by injustice and the depth of cruelty involved.
(There is also a section III about another kind of injustice and
cruelty, that of the murder of a six year old girl, a baby “Beauty
Queen,” tortured and killed for no apparent reason at all.) Although
the three incidents are all horrific, the lynching of the young black
man has the added elements of racist hatred and rage and their
momentary satisfactions which despite some progress, remain
today. I poke fun at the “rubes” but fact is the Southern Poverty
Leadership Council (SPLCenter.org), since 1971, is still doing a
helluva business reporting on and fighting hate groups and their
crimes.
~ ANGELA CONSOLO MANKIEWICZ
WE SHALL OVERCOME
SPEECH BY
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR
31 MARCH 1968
American Poet Angela Consolo Mankiewicz
PRINTED WITH PERMISSION
Trayvon Martin wearing a hoodie

ARCHIVES
HAIKU VERSES
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011

ARCHIVES
FEATURED POETS
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
AMERICAN POET
(1944-2017)